Author: Rob Cole

Re-print from: Sky News Online

Some 2,200 US Marines have arrived in Haiti to help with the recovery effort but aid is still failing to reach those who need it.

Sky News US correspondent Robert Nisbet said the situation was slowly improving in the capital, Port-au-Prince.

But anger is mounting over the amount of time it has taken to get aid into the city.

“There is building anger here about how long it’s taking to unclog the aid supply,” he said.

“We watched a consignment unloaded at the Red Cross depot but issues with fuel and traffic meant the truck convoy never left.

“Logistically this is an enormous challenge but the perception on the ground is that the aid is failing to reach those who need it.”

Haiti Earthquake

Sky News chief correspondent Stuart Ramsay, inside Port-au-Prince, said survivors were desperate for help.

“Something is going to have to change here pretty soon, I suspect, because things have definitely been getting worse,” he said.

“People are running out of water – really running out of water. Not just a bit thirsty, they have not got any water at all.

“(US troops) are meant to be here, not peacekeeping but making sure this aid relief works … but this has got to happen soon because people really are at the end now.”

Medical aid organisation Médecins Sans Frontières‘ emergency co-ordinator Renzo Frick told Sky News there were lengthy delays in receiving aid.

Looting in Haiti after earthquake

Peacekeepers disperse protesters at the capital’s airport

“We have been waiting for hours – all the night – and in the end we did not receive the medical supplies, which really would help our medical operations,” he said.

But, speaking on Jeff Randall Live, the EU’s new High Representative for Foreign Affairs, Baroness Ashton, said help was getting through.

“It’s taken time to get the roads cleared to get the equipment in. The news we’re getting is that things are moving and there’s a huge amount of support going into Haiti,” she said.

Looting in Haiti after earthquake

Private police say they need more help tackling looters

Some 14,000 ready-to-eat meals and 15,000 litres of water have been dropped in a secure area northeast of Port-au-Prince, a US military spokeswoman said.

The security situation also remains precarious.

Hundreds of looters, scavengers and desperate survivors have been emptying wrecked shops, clashing with police and fighting each other with knives, hammers, ice-picks and rocks.

“We do not have the capacity to fix this situation. Haiti needs help … the Americans are welcome here. But where are they? We need them here on the street with us,” said policeman Dorsainvil Robenson, deployed to chase looters in the capital.

Haiti Earthquake Appeal

The White House says more than 11,000 US military personnel are on the ground, on ships offshore or en route.

And more than 30 countries have rushed rescue teams, doctors, field hospitals, food, medicine and other supplies to Haiti.

Trucks piled with corpses have been ferrying bodies to hurriedly excavated mass graves outside the capital, but tens of thousands of victims are still believed buried under the rubble.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon said he had recommended to the Security Council that 1,500 police and 2,000 troops be added to the 9,000-member UN peacekeeping mission in Haiti.

Haiti officials say UN peacekeepers have been unable to provide full security but a US military official said the violence was isolated and was not impeding the humanitarian aid mission.

Meanwhile, the US says it will temporarily allow in orphaned children from Haiti to receive care and consideration for adoption.

“While we remain focused on family reunification in Haiti, authorising the use of humanitarian parole for orphans who are eligible for adoption in the United States will allow them to receive the care they need here,” Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said.

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